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HOME WATCH SERVICE PLAN...

Posted on 5 November, 2014 at 23:56 Comments comments (0)
Who is looking after your home while you are on vacation or on your next business trip?

WriteRegistration of Canadians Abroad

Posted on 7 July, 2014 at 22:54 Comments comments (0)
WriteRegistration of Canadians Abroad is a free service offered by Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada that keeps you connected to Canada in case of an emergency abroad, such as an earthquake or civil unrest, or an emergency at home.

Whether you're planning a vacation or living abroad, sign up in a few minutes or less. your post here.

PROTECTION AGAINST AGGRESIVE DOOR -to-DOOR SALES

Posted on 5 July, 2014 at 15:03 Comments comments (0)
Strengthening Protection Against Aggressive Door-to-Door SalesOntario Government Introducing New Consumer Protection Reforms
 
Ministry of Consumer Services
 
Ontario is taking steps to provide consumers with more protection against aggressive, high pressure, door-to-door sales tactics, especially for the sale of water heaters.  
As part of its plan to strengthen consumer protection, the province intends to introduce legislation that, if passed, would impose new rules for dealing with door-to-door sales fairly, including:
  • Doubling the existing 10-day cooling-off period to 20 days for water heaters, providing consumers more time to consider their decision
  • Banning delivery and installation of water heaters during the new 20-day cooling-off period
  • Creating rules requiring companies to confirm sales by making scripted and recorded telephone calls to the customer and that key contract terms are disclosed in clear, easy-to-understand language
  • Providing new consumer protections when the rules are not followed, such as requiring the supplier to pay all cancellation fees when the 20-day cooling-off period is not observed
These proposed reforms would help protect the rights of consumers while furthering the new Ontario government's commitment to building a strong economy and a fair, safe and informed marketplace.

AUTHENTICATION of DOCUMENTS

Posted on 5 July, 2014 at 14:10 Comments comments (0)
Foreign countries and organizations often require the authentication of documents and the legalization of documents before accepting them.
  
Golden Age Concierge can assist you in obtaining the authentication of documents through the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Development.

We will then process the legalization of the documents with the respective embassy, high commission or consulate located in Ottawa, Canada.

For additional information on the Canadian requirements for the authentication of documents and the legalization of documents we suggest that you visit the following link:        
 
  





Home Watch Service Plan...

Posted on 29 June, 2014 at 9:45 Comments comments (0)

 
Who will be looking after your home when you are on vacation or a business trip?
 
Will your insurance be voided should your residence be unoccupied for more than 72 hours?
 
Who will handle any emergencies caused by a leaking hot water tank or burst pipe while you away?
 
Golden Age Concierge is proud to introduce our Home Watch Service Plan that ensures your back is covered while you are on vacation or a business trip.
 
Golden Age Concierge will inspect your home every 72 hours or on a schedule approved by your insurance company. A copy of our report will be e-mailed to you after each inspection.
 
If we discover any problems that require immediate attention, we will contact you and if necessary the local authorities.
 
Golden Age Concierge can help make arrangements for and oversee any repairs that may be needed.  We will disburse up to $500.00 to secure the home if you cannot be contacted.
 
Our Home Watch Service Plan Includes
 
  • Inspection of  the interior and exterior of the property at the time of each visit
  • Shut off water & drain system (as appropriate)
  • Clear newspapers (Daily)
  • Pick up mail (Daily)
  •  Check mechanical and electrical systems
  • Water indoor plants
  • Monitor security system, smoke and CO detectors
  • Run water on each visit ensuring tap seals remain moist, furnace humidifiers have water and hot water heaters are topped up
  • Replace furnace filters if required
  •  PAWS-ITIVE  Pet Services for your pets

PRIOR TO YOUR RETURN


·         Prepare home for your return
  •  If requested we will start-up and run garaged vehicles
  • Weather permitting, open windows to air out the home
  • Shop for basic groceries 
 
 
PERSONAL ASSISTANT
  • Make pre-approved bill payments
  • Oversee contractors including garden and snow removal services
 
INCIDENTAL TRANSPORTATION
 
Need a ride to the airport, no problem. Golden Age Concierge is happy to drive you and pick you up on your return from your trip.
 
It should be noted that Golden Age Concierge services are only available in Ottawa Ontario and surrounding areas
 

 

Strengthening Protection Against Aggressive Door-to-Door Sales

Posted on 20 August, 2013 at 17:14 Comments comments (0)
Ontario Government Introducing New Consumer Protection Reforms
 
Ontario is taking steps to provide consumers with more protection against aggressive, high pressure, door-to-door sales tactics, especially for the sale of water heaters.  
As part of its plan to strengthen consumer protection, the province intends to introduce legislation that, if passed, would impose new rules for dealing with door-to-door sales fairly, including:
  • Doubling the existing 10-day cooling-off period to 20 days for water heaters, providing consumers more time to consider their decision
  • Banning delivery and installation of water heaters during the new 20-day cooling-off period
  • Creating rules requiring companies to confirm sales by making scripted and recorded telephone calls to the customer and that key contract terms are disclosed in clear, easy-to-understand language
  • Providing new consumer protections when the rules are not followed, such as requiring the supplier to pay all cancellation fees when the 20-day cooling-off period is not observed
These proposed reforms would help protect the rights of consumers while furthering the new Ontario government's commitment to building a strong economy and a fair, safe and informed marketplace.

What every older Canadian should know about Frauds and Scams

Posted on 17 June, 2013 at 13:48 Comments comments (0)
 
 
Fraud is the number one crime against older Canadians. Though people of all ages can be victims of fraud, older people get targeted more than others. Some of the reasons are that they are often home during the day to answer the door or phone, they can be more trusting and they may not have family or friends close by to ask for a second opinion.

People who commit frauds and scams are commonly called con artists. Con artists don’t just target people who have a lot of money. A con artist may steal a small amount from many people. They use a variety of ways to reach people, including the Internet, phone calls and even door-to-door visits. Victor’s story:
Victor received a phone call telling him he had won a free trip. The caller started by congratulating Victor and telling him about the exciting details of the trip. Then the caller told Victor he needed to pay a small fee right away in order to claim his trip and asked Victor for his credit card number. Victor knew he had not entered a contest for a free trip and he also knew he should not give his credit card number over the phone to a stranger, especially one who called him. Victor hung up and called PhoneBusters to report a probable scam.

Common types of frauds and scamsIdentity theft
Identity theft occurs when a con artist steals personal information from someone so they can pretend to be that person and then do things like apply for a credit card, take out a loan or mortgage, get a cell phone or withdraw bank funds. The con artist will try to get information such as a bank card number and personal identity number (PIN), credit card number, health card number, driver’s license and Social Insurance Number (SIN). Sometimes they will steal or copy the documents; sometimes all they need is the information. If your wallet is lost or stolen, or mail you are expecting goes missing, you should report it right away to your bank or credit union.

Credit/debit card frauds
Credit card and debit card fraud occurs when a con artist uses your card, or a copy, to make purchases or withdraw money from your account. Keeping your card in sight, memorizing your PIN, and shielding your hand when you enter your PIN are ways you can reduce the risk of your credit card or debit card information being stolen and misused.

Online scams
There are many online scams and new ones appear all the time. Some appear to be asking for your help; some say there is a problem with your bank account or tax return. Scam e-mails are often easy to spot because of spelling and other mistakes, but some can look like they are coming from a person or organization you know. If you are not sure about an e-mail—for example, if it asks you respond with personal or financial information or to go to another Web site and enter information there—call to check, and do not respond to the e-mail.

Phone and door-to-door scamsPhone and door-to-door scams are also very common. Someone will call or come to your door pretending to be a representative of a charity, an employee of a credit card company, or even a distant relative. You might be offered a free prize or trip. If you aren’t completely sure who you are dealing with, do not give the person any money or information.

Sometimes people call or come to your door using high-pressure sales tactics to get you to buy something you don’t want or need, or to talk you into getting work done on your house and then overcharging you or doing a bad job. While this is not always illegal, it is wrong and should be reported.

Tips and safeguardsKeep all personal documents in a secure place. If you don’t need them, do not carry your birth certificate, passport or SIN card.

Never tell another person your PIN or account passwords and take care to cover your hand when entering your PIN at bank machines and when making store purchases.

Safely dispose of old bills and statements—shredding is best.

Do not click on pop-up windows or respond to e-mails, open attachments or go to Web site links sent by people you do not know. Your bank or credit union will not send you anything by e-mail unless you ask them to.

Never give out your credit card, bank account, or personal information to someone over the phone, at the door, or over the Internet unless you know the person or organization you are dealing with, or you made the contact.

Do not sign an agreement or contract to buy anything without giving yourself time to think it over. If a salesperson insists that an “offer” is “time limited” and you must decide that moment, it is probably better not to buy.

Be suspicious if someone you don’t know asks you to send them money or a cheque, or to return money they “accidentally” sent you.

Before hiring someone or agreeing to have work done on your home, ask for proof of identity and references and check them.

Other brochures in this seriesWhat every older Canadian should know about:
  1. Financial planning
  2. Income and benefits from government programs
  3. Managing and protecting their assets
  4. Planning for possible loss of independence
  5. Planning for their future housing needs
  6. Having a will and making funeral plans
  7. Financial abuse
  8. Frauds and scams
What should I do if I think I have been scammed?All frauds and scams should be reported, even if you are embarrassed or feel the amount of money is too small to worry about. While you might not be able to get your money back, you can help stop the con artist from scamming other people.

Report all frauds and scams to your local police, or call PhoneBusters at 1-888-495-8501.

Where can I find out more?There are many good on-line sources of information about frauds and scams. The Financial Consumer Agency of Canada Web site www.fcac.gc.ca, provides information about your rights in dealing with banks and other financial institutions.

For more information, visit www.seniors.gc.ca or visit your local Service Canada office. To order additional copies of this publication, or for help finding a phone number in your province or territory, call 1 800 O-Canada (1-800-622-6232), TTY: 1-800-926-9105. © All Rights Reserved, 2010
8. What every older Canadian should know about frauds and scams.
Cat. No.: HS64-12/8-2010
ISBN: 978-1-100-51531-1

Safety in your home

Posted on 19 March, 2013 at 23:30 Comments comments (15)
Safety in your home
Throughout Your Home ensure that:
  • Floors are not slippery.
  • Pathways are clear of extension cords and other objects.
  • Rugs have no ripples or tears.
  • Scatter mats are removed or taped to the floor.
  • Low tables are removed from the middle of the living room.
  • All furniture is sturdy.
  • Chairs have armrests and are the correct height.
  • All light fixtures have a minimum of 60 watt bulbs.
  • Entrance to every room has a light switch.
  • Stepladder or step stool is sturdy, and the step surface is not slippery.
  • Items used every day are stored within easy reach.
Entrance
  • Doors open easily.
  • There is a sturdy seat with arm rests.
  • Mail is within easy reach.
  • Exterior and interior lighting is good.
  • Outside pathways are free of lawn furniture, hoses and other objects.
Bedroom
  • A telephone is easily reached from the bed.
  • A lamp is easily reached from the bed.
  • The bed is the correct height.
Bathroom
  • Bath-tub plug is easy to reach, and to use.
  • A rubber mat is used for every bath or shower, or.
  • Anti-slip decals on the bottom of the bath-tub are no more than 2" apart.
  • There are at least two grab bars in the tub area
  • Portable grab bars (on the side of the tub) do not move when used for support.
  • Rug outside the bathtub has a rubber backing.
If you have problems getting into or out of the bath-tub, use:
  • a bath seat.
  • a hand held shower.
If you have problems sitting on or getting up from the toilet, use:
  • a raised toilet seat.
  • a grab bar conveniently located.
Stairs (inside and outside)
  • Stair edges are marked with contrasting colour.
  • All steps are the same height.
  • All steps are the same depth.
  • Stairs have a non-slip surface.
  • Handrails are present on both sides of stairs.
  • Handrail height feels comfortable when used for support.
  • Handrails extends 12 inches beyond the top and bottom steps.
  • Handrails are round.
Personal habits
  • Move slowly after lying or sitting to prevent dizziness.
  • Always wear well fitted shoes or slippers with low heels and non-slip soles.
  • Do not wear long skirts, long house coats, or loose slacks.
  • Do not use bath oil.
  • Turn on a night light before going to bed.
  • Turn on a light when getting up at night.
  • Avoid using a ladder or step stool.

FALL PREVENTION

Posted on 4 March, 2013 at 13:59 Comments comments (13)
Anyone can fall. But as we age, our risk of falling becomes greater and the injuries suffered are much more severe. One in three seniors will experience a fall each year. The good news is that many injuries due to falls can be prevented. Take steps to protect yourself.Factors that increase your risk of falling are:
  • You are over the age of 65.
  • You take medication to help you sleep or calm your nerves.
  • You take more than 4 medications per day.
  • You have problems with balance or difficulty walking.
  • You have difficulty getting in or out of the bathtub unassisted.
  • You have problems with strength or sensation in your legs or feet
  • You have had a slip, trip or fall in the last 12 months.
MedicationsTo reduce your risks of falls, follow these tips:
  • Review your medication with your doctor every 6 months.
  • Ask your doctor or pharmacist about the side effects of your medication.
  • Tell your doctor if your medication makes you dizzy or lightheaded.
  • Never take someone else's medication.
  • Talk to your doctor if insomnia persists.
Using A Cane
  • Make sure your cane is the correct height for you.
  • Standing with your arms at you sides, turn the cane upside down and put the handle on the floor. The tip of the cane should be at the level of your wrist.
  • Aluminum canes can be easily adjusted on the shaft.
  • For wooden canes, remove the rubber tip. Mark the cane at wrist level and deduct ½ inch. Cut the cane and replace the rubber tip.
Note: Many stores that sell canes will cut or adjust your cane. See Hospital Equipment and Supplies in the Yellow Pages.
  • If you have a "bad" leg (weakness or pain), hold the cane opposite the "bad" leg. If not, use the cane on your strong side.
  • Always move the cane and the opposite leg together.
  • Replace worn rubber tips and attach an ice pick in winter.
  • When going up stairs, lead with your strong leg then move the cane and the "bad" leg to the same step.
  • When going down stairs, lead with the cane and the "bad" leg then lower the strong leg to the same step.
Walker
  • Adjust your walker to the correct height and roll the walker forward as you step into the centre of the walker.
  • Use the hand brakes correctly.
  • To lock brakes: push down on brake handles.
  • To unlock brakes: pull up on handles and release.
  • To slow down: pull up and squeeze brake handles.
  • To sit on the seat of the walker be sure to lock the brakes. Slowly turn. Transfer one hand to the opposite walker handle for support. Grip both handles as you sit down.
  • When standing up from a chair or bed position, put the walker in front of you and lock the breaks. Do not pull on the walker as it may tip, but push up from the chair. Unlock the brakes before proceeding.
  • To transfer to a chair, back up to the chair until your legs touch the seat. Lock the brakes and reach for the armrest support before sitting.
Step stoolTo be safe, avoid using a step stool by storing everyday items within easy reach or asking for assistance. A safe step stool should have these characteristics:
  • The surface of each step is non-skid.
  • The edge of each step is marked with a contrasting colour.
  • There are side rails which extend above the last step and around to the front.
  • The base is wider than the top to prevent tipping.
  • The legs are sturdy and fitted with rubber tips.
When using a step stool:
  • Look for the label to ensure it is strong enough to hold your body weight.
  • Place firmly on an even surface, free of clutter and lock the legs into place.
  • Climb facing the steps and do not lean forward or stretch.
  • Only reach for items directly in front of you.
  • Never stand on the top step.
Safe Bathroom
  • Install a minimum of two slip resistant grab bars. Ensure that they are secured to the wall by an expert.
  • Adjust a bath bench according to you needs and be sure the legs have rubber tips.
  • A rubber bath mat should cover the entire length of the tub and does not move once it is installed. Another option is to apply anti-slip decals placed no more than two inches apart on the bottom of the tub.
  • The floor rug in a bathroom should have a rubber backing.
  • Do not use the towel rack or soap dish to get in or out of the tub.
  • Do not use bath oil in the water.
  • Use a hand held shower.
  • Install a raised toilet seat and/or grab bar.
Chairs, sofas and bedsMost furniture is too low which can create a difficulty when getting up from the seat. Correct height:
  • While sitting on the furniture, measure the distance from the floor to the seat.
  • While standing, measure the distance from the floor to the top of your knee cap. These two measurements should be the same.
Adjustments:
  • Add firm foam pads to the seat of the chair or sofa.
  • Use sturdy bed blocks under the legs of the sofa or bed.
 

12 STEPS TO STAIR SAFETY AT HOME

Posted on 14 January, 2013 at 15:40 Comments comments (10)
Seniors are more at risk for falling on stairs than younger adults, and more likely to suffer severe injuries. In fact, seniors 65+ account for 70% of the deaths resulting from stair accidents.
Take a few minutes to review the safety of your stairs and how you use them.
  1. Is there a light switch at the top and bottom of your stairs?
    Install lights and switches to ensure all your stairways are well lit.
  2. Are all your steps in good repair?
    Make sure there are no uneven surfaces, cracks, bunched-up stair-covering or protruding nails.
  3. Are the steps all of the same size and height?
    Have a carpenter correct uneven steps. They are a major hazard.
  4. Are you able to see the edges of the steps clearly?
    Paint a contrasting color on the edge of wooden or concrete steps (or on the top and bottom steps), or apply special strips you can buy to enhance the visibility of each step.
  5. If you have a covering on your stairs, is it fastened securely?
    Stair carpeting can cause slips. Consider removing it or replacing it with well-secured rubber stair treading.
  6. Is the handrail well attached to the wall and easily grasped?
    Make sure the handrail is well-secured and that you can get your full hand around it.
  7. Is the handrail at a height of 34 to 38 inches (86 to 97 cm)?
    There should be a handrail on at least one side of all stairways. The height should allow you to use it comfortably when your arm is slightly bent at the elbow.
  8. Are your stairs free of clutter?
    Avoid storing things temporarily on your stairs. Always check the stairs as you walk up or down.
  9. Have you removed loose carpets or throw rugs from your stair landings?
    Loose floor coverings are a hazard. If you have rugs make sure they are non-slip, or have a rubber backing.
  10. Do you take your time when going up or down the stairs?
    Go slowly with your hand on the handrail. Rushing is a major cause of falls.
  11. Do you make sure your vision isn't blocked as you go up or down your stairs?
    If you're carrying something, make sure it doesn't hide the stairs and that one hand is free to use the handrail.
  12. Do you remove your reading glasses when using stairs?
    Be sure to remove your reading glasses when walking or climbing up or down stairs. If you use bifocals, adjust your glasses so you can see the stairs clearly
 
 

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